THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

Prognostic genes in pancreatic cancer

2017-11-17
Cancer Immunohistochemistry Pancreatic cancer Pathology Atlas TCGA tissue

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of MUC1 shows differential expression pattern, high (left panel) and low (right panel) in

Next in our series of articles on cancer is Pancreatic cancer, a relatively rare cancer associated with very poor prognosis. The vast majority of tumors originate from ductal cells and a small fraction are endocrine tumors. Over 80% of pancreatic cancers develop at ages above 60 years and most tumors are detected at late stages of the disease when the cancer has spread beyond the pancreas.

There is a great need for biomarkers to facilitate early detection and help establishment of diagnosis. Smoking, obesity, physical inactivity and long-lasting inflammation in the pancreas are some of the factors that lead to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer...Read more


650 genes associated with prognosis in Lung Cancer

2017-10-13
Cancer CancerProteomics Immunohistochemistry Lung cancer Pathology Atlas Proteomics TCGA

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of MPC1 using antibody HPA045119 shows differential expression pattern, both high (left panel) and low (right panel), in samples from lung cancer patients.

As part of the release Pathology Atlas release, the Human Protein Atlas will each week present a brief and informative summary highlighting genes with prognostic association in different cancer forms. This week, we will focus on Lung cancer one of the deadliest cancers in the world today.

Lung cancer patients have a poor outcome with a 5-year survival rate of 13.6% in men and 19.4% in women. Late diagnosis and lack of effective treatments are considered to contribute to poor prognosis. Smoking is the leading risk factor and is responsible for 70-90% of the lung cancer cases. Lung cancer can be divided into small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)...Read more


Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

2017-09-29
Cancer Immunohistochemistry Life Science Ovarian cancer awareness Pathology Atlas Plasma Profilling TCGA tissue

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of EPCAM using antibody CAB055098 shows differential expression, both high (left panel) and low (right panel) in samples from ovarian cancer patients.

In this week's Pathology Atlas blog post, we highlight genes with prognostic association to ovarian cancer , as September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month in the US. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer death in women, and 50% of all ovarian cancers are diagnosed in women older than 65 years of age.

Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancy. There are five subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma, of which high-grade serous carcinoma is the most common...Read more


Awareness for prostate cancer

2017-09-27
European Prostate Cancer Awareness Day Immunohistochemistry Life Science Pathology Atlas Prostate cancer Prostate Cancer Awareness Month TCGA tissue

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of ODF2 using antibody HPA001874 shows differential expression in samples from prostate cancer patients.

As part of the release of the Pathology Atlas, the Human Protein Atlas Blog presents brief and informative summaries of most cancers, and highlight genes with prognostic association in the different cancer forms. The Pathology Atlas is an open access database which includes quantitative transcriptomics data and spatial proteomics data of the major human cancer types that have been analyzed using a systems level approach.

We focus on prostate cancer in this week's blog post to highlight Prostate Cancer Awareness Month in North America and the European Prostate Cancer Awareness Day on the 27th of September...Read more


Focusing on prognostic genes in breast cancer

2017-09-07
Breast Cancer Cancer Cancer Genome Atlas Immunohistochemistry Pathology Atlas TCGA tissue

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of CBX3 using antibody HPA004902 shows a differential nuclear expression in samples from breast cancer patients.

The Pathology Atlas, recently published in Science presents key proteins associated with different cancer types. This week's news article will focus on breast cancer and proteins related to cancer prognosis.

Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer form in women worldwide. The cancer can roughly be classified as ductal or lobular breast cancer depending on the origin. The majority of breast cancers develop sporadically, but for 5-10% of patients there is an inherited factor associated with increased breast cancer risk, namely the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with abnormal BRCA1 or BRCA2 have higher risk of developing breast cancer...Read more


Invited lecture at the 29th European Congress of Pathology

2017-08-30
Conference Diagnostics Human Protein Atlas Life Science Pathology Pathology Atlas

This weekend Amsterdam is hosting the 29th European Congress of Pathology (ECP 2017). Fredrik Ponten, Co-Founder and Clinical Director of the Human Protein Atlas program, will present a lecture on September 3 entitled "Tissue-based map of the human proteome as tool for pathology". The focus of this year´s European congress will be "Pathology for Patient Care" highlighting the added value of the pathology science and discipline in providing care and improving health outcomes for patients and population. The congress is expected to provide updates on all aspects of diagnostic and molecular pathology...Read more


Highlighting the prognostic genes in colon cancer

2017-08-25
Cancer Colorectal cancer Immunohistochemistry Pathology Atlas

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of JDP2 protein using HPA059511 antibody shows a differential expression in samples from colorectal cancer patients.

Last week the Human Protein Atlas portal was updated with a new Pathology Atlas - an interactive atlas where the expression of specific genes and their influence on patient survival in the 17 major cancer types can be explored. The Pathology Atlas includes quantitative genome-wide transcriptomics data (RNA-seq) of the 17 cancers coupled with clinical outcome and spatial proteomics data (immunohistochemistry) of more than 15,000 proteins.

During the next weeks, we will highlight different cancer types included in the analysis and also show examples of genes with unfavourable and favourable prognostic significance. This week's news article features colorectal cancer...Read more


New Pathology Atlas maps the genes involved in cancer and promotes personalized cancer medicine

2017-08-17
Cancer Human Protein Atlas Pathology Atlas

Pathology Atlas principle

A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine. In addition, the systems level approach used to construct the Pathology Atlas demonstrates the power of "big data" to change how medical research is performed.

The dream of personalized treatment for cancer patients takes a major step forward today with the launch by Swedish researchers of the Human Pathology Atlas...Read more


NIFK interacts with the proliferation marker Ki-67

2017-05-24
Cancer Cancer Atlas Image of the month Immunocytochemistry Immunohistochemical staining KI-67 Melanoma Pathology Atlas Skin cancer

Skin with growth of a cutaneous melanoma expressing the protein NIFK.

Melanoma is a common form of cancer in the skin and among skin cancers it is the most deadly form. Melanoma originates from cells of melanocytic origin and most typically begins as a small intraepidermal tumor (melanoma in situ). As the tumor continues to grow and progress, tumor cells invade the epidermis and eventually spread to regional lymph nodes and subsequently via hematogenic spread to distant organs. Tumor thickness of the primary tumor is the most important determining prognostic factor and thus is early discovery of key importance for survival.

The cancer image of the month shows skin with growth of a cutaneous melanoma...Read more


AACR Annual Meeting 2017

2017-04-04
Cancer Conference Immunohistochemistry Pathology Atlas tissue

Cecilia Lindskog and Borbala Katona in the booth

A team from the Human Protein Atlas is attending the AACR Annual Meeting 2017 in Washington DC right now. This year, the meeting covers topics on research propelling cancer prevention and cures. The Human Protein Atlas is represented by a booth where researchers give a personalized tutorial of the portal to interested visitors. In addition, a demo version of a new Pathology Atlas containing information on prognostic genes and proteins associated with clinical outcome. The Pathology Atlas focuses on 17 major cancer types in humans...Read more


CD44 as a marker of renal cancer

2017-03-31
Cancer Image of the week Immunohistochemistry Pathology Atlas Renal Cell Carcinoma

Renal cell cancer is a relatively common form of human cancer. Tumors develop in the kidney and have a tendency to grow into renal veins and metastasize to distant organs without the spread to regional lymph nodes as is common for many other tumor types.

This particular case shows a papillary form of renal cell cancer that grows with papillary excrescences into cyst formations and with areas of necrosis. The tumor has been stained with an antibody (HPA005785) that recognizes the CD44 protein.

CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and a receptor for hyaluronic acid that is involved in cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion and migration...Read more


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