THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

NFIL3 a protein that follows the winter season

2017-11-24
Cell Atlas cells Immunofluorescence microscopy

Staining of NFIL3 (green) in nuclear bodies with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in A-431 cells.

Staining of NFIL3 (green) in nuclear bodies with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in A-431 cells. Many human genes follow a so called circadian clock and research has shown that some of those genes themselves follow the seasons (Dopico et al. 2015). When winter is coming, you sense it and your genes know it too. Expression of one of those genes, NFIL3, peaks during December until February and has its lowest expression during the summer months.

NFIL3 is a transcriptional regulator involved in regulation of immune processes. Like many other transcription regulators it localizes to nuclear bodies as seen on the Cell Atlas images and binds to specific DNA motifs...Read more


The HPA at the Image-based Cell Atlas Meeting

2017-10-06
Cell Atlas Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative Image analysis Immunofluorescence microscopy Proteomics

Participants at the Image-based Cell Atlas Meeting 2017

The importance of mapping the human cell has become recognized as one of the key challenges in modern biology. Image-based assays offer a data-rich medium of studying cells and their proteins in situ. As such, several large-scale initiatives for studying cellular biology using image-based assays have been founded in recent years...Read more


Human Protein Atlas presentations at the 16th HUPO World Congress

2017-09-14
Affinity proteomics Cell Atlas Conference Human Protein Atlas Immunofluorescence microscopy Immunohistochemistry Sub-cellular structures Tissue Atlas

Next week on the 17th to 21th of September, the human proteome organization (HUPO), is hosting the 16th HUPO World Congress in Dublin, Ireland. Several Human Protein Atlas-associated researchers will attend the meeting and represent the project in various sessions, including plenary and invited lectures, oral presentations and poster sessions.

HUPO is an international scientific organization representing and promoting proteomics through international cooperation and collaborations by fostering the development of new technologies, techniques and training...Read more


Symposium celebrating 100-years anniversary Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation

2017-09-08
Cell Atlas Conference Human Protein Atlas Immunofluorescence microscopy Project Discovery Subcell Atlas subcellular structures

The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW) cellebrates 100-years anniversary of funding research within natural sciences, technology and medicine. Since 1917, when KAW was established, grants have been awarded to enpower both scientific research and education beneficial for the society. Today the foundation is one of the largest private funders of scientific research in Europe.

The KAW funded Molecular Life Science - anniversary symposium is organised by the Royal Academy of Sciences together with KTH - The Royal Institute of Technology, Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University...Read more


Keynote lecture at CYTO2017 in Boston

2017-06-12
Cell Atlas cell lines CYTO2017 Human Protein Atlas Immunofluorescence microscopy Single cell analysis

Emma Lundberg Director of the Human Cell Atlas, will present a keynote lecture on June 14th, entitled ”The Cell Atlas: A subcellular map of the human proteome” on the 32ndCongress of the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry in Boston, USA.

On this occassion, the CYTO Congress together with the Human Protein Atlas have organized a challenge for analysis of the images from the Cell Atlas, culminating in presentation of results in the final conference session, where participants will present their analytical methods and findings...Read more


JAK is not only just another kinase

2017-06-06
Cell Atlas cell lines Immunofluorescence microscopy JAK protein family Nucleus protein kinases

The JAK – or Janus kinases, are intracellular proteins that transduce signals from cytokine receptors via the JAK-STAT pathway. More specifically the JAK family phosphorylates the receptor and thus activates downstream proteins, including transcription factors called STATs (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription). These transcription factors then migrate to the nucleus where they regulate transcription of many genes with diverse function, including cell growth, development and differentiation...Read more


TACO1 an ubiquitous protein governing expression of the mitochondrial genome

2017-04-21
Cell Atlas cells Image of the week Immunofluorescence microscopy Mitochondria Mitochondrial disorders

Antibody HPA021643 in U-2 OS recognizing TACO1 in mitochondria.

Mitochondria harbors an own genome that renders key proteins involved in production of energy through oxidation of various substrates. Majority of the disorders associated with mitochondrial function are caused by impaired expression of the proteins encoded in the mitochondrial genome. One of these proteins is the translational activator of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (TACO1).

Experimental results reveal that TACO1 is expressed in all tissues within the human body. The protein is detected mainly in the cytoplasm and more precise inside mitochondria. Explore expression and subcellular localization of TACO1 in the Cell Atlas...Read more


Citrate synthase and mitochondrial disease

2016-09-23
Cell Atlas cells Immunofluorescence microscopy Sub-cellular structures

Figure 1. Staining of CS (green) with DAPI (blue) and microtubules (red) in U2 OS cells.

Mitochondria are responsible for the energy production in our cells. The most interesting thing about mitochondria is that they have their own DNA which means some proteins in the mitochondria come from nuclear DNA and some from mitochondrial DNA. In a previous image of the week we highlighted TOMM5, a protein responsible for transport of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins into the mitochondria.

In this week's image of the week we take a look at citrate synthase (CS), a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein that is a key enzyme for the citric acid cycle of the cell (TCA cycle), also known as the Krebs cycle...Read more


Image of the week - Nucleoli fibrillar center

2016-07-22
Cell Atlas cells Immunofluorescence microscopy organelles

Figure 1. Staining of NOLC1 (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

This week, image of the week highlights another organelle, the nucleoli fibrillar center!! This week's contribution is brought to us by Lovisa Åkesson, who works on the Subcellular protein atlas, and specializes in understanding nuclear function.

A few months ago, an excellent example of a protein located in the nucleoli rim was shown in another blog post. Today, we are diving deeper into the function of the nucleoli and specifically the fibrillar center, another nucleolar compartment.

As mentioned before, the nucleolus is a non-membrane bound structure located within the nucleus and there is usually more than one in each nucleus...Read more


Vesicles with GFP

2016-05-29
Cell Atlas cells Immunofluorescence microscopy organelles

Figure 1. Staining of RAB5C (green) with DNA (blue) in HeLa cells.

Welcome to another HPA image of the week! This week we take a look at vesicles and another type of data present in the HPA.

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of RAB5C. This protein is found in vesicles and specifically, in lysosomes of the cell. This sample shows HeLa human cervical adenocarcinoma cells.

These cells are actually transgenic and made to express green fluorescent protein on the RAB5C protein (RAB5Cgfp). This is a method we use to check the validity of our antibodies...Read more


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